Photography is a strange phenomenon. You trust your eye and you cannot help
but bare your soul. One's vision finds of necessity the form suitable to express it.

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Death and Legacy

Magnum: Our Turning World exhibition (detail). London, 1999.© Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos.Ingeborg Morath Miller died of cancer in 2002, at the age of 78. In honor of their colleague, the members of Magnum Photos established the Inge Morath Award in 2002. The Award is administered by the Inge Morath Foundation in cooperation with the Magnum Foundation, New York.

Since its inception, each year one or more exceptional young women photographers have been named as recipients of the IM Award. Recipients are selected by the members of Magnum at their annual meeting, and are granted $5,000 to support the completion of a documentary project. Virtually all IM Award recipients have gone on to achieve significant successes in the field.

The Inge Morath Foundation was established by Morath’s family, in 2003, to preserve and share her legacy. The Foundation holds an archive of Inge Morath’s work and related materials that is unsurpassed in scope and depth. Comprised of thousands of items from all periods of Morath’s life, the archive includes Morath’s collection of her own works, her contact sheets, caption books, and writings related to her work. All archived works are documented in the Foundation’s database. The Foundation uses this resource for its own work, as well as to encourage students, scholars, and curators in their research. Most works held by the Foundation are available for loan to appropriate programs and venues.

Recent exhibitions of the Inge Morath Foundation include Well Disposed and Trying to See: Inge Morath and Arthur Miller in China, University of Michigan Art Museum, Ann Arbor, 2008; Inge Morath: The Road to Reno, Chicago Cultural Center, 2004; and Inge Morath: Chinese Encounters, Pingyao International Photography Festival, Pingyao, China, 2004. Forthcoming books include a visual history of Arthur Miller’s plays, in collaboration with the Arthur Miller Literary Trust, and the first in-depth publication of Morath’s photographs of refugee camps, with actor/photographer Yul Brynner, in Europe and the Middle East, from 1960.

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